You are here
Home > Living History Guide > Living History Guide – Clothing

Living History Guide – Clothing

This document is not intended to be a stick with which to beat members into conforming, but is offered in response to a need for guidance for new members. Much of the information will be seen as common sense, but within this will be more details about construction and mid-17th century styles which may not be common knowledge. Research into clothing of the time is ongoing, and new information will be reflected in this guide as it is published.

Women

Standard Requirements

These are the garments which every participating civilian female member of the regiment should be wearing within three years of joining or of receipt of this document. Help can be given by the regiment in lending patterns and booklets, and supplying advice and materials if required.

Smock (shift) …………………….Linen
Hose (stockings) ………………..Wool or Linen
Bodies/bodice/stays ……………Linen
Petticotes (skirts) 1 or 2 ……..Wool and/or Linen
Waistcote (Jacket) …………….Wool or Linen
Coif (cap) …………………………Linen
Neckerchief ……………………..Linen
Apron ……………………………..Wool or Linen
Shoes ………………………………Leather – period pattern

 

 

 

 

Each of these garments will be described as to the acceptable styles and forms in which they can be worn.

Clothes may be either machine sewn with visible stitching done by hand, or entirely hand stitched as it would have been at the time; time consuming but very satisfying!

If buying clothing from traders please ask for advice before proceeding as many are not up to our standards.

Other articles of clothing can and should be worn where appropriate to the character which is being portrayed; a camp follower, town or country woman. Things to consider when choosing your clothes: what is your husband/father’s status? If he is a common labourer where would you obtain your clothing? Is it new or 2nd (3rd or 4th) hand? Remember 17th century society was very conservative and women were third and fourth class citizens with little or no independence or privacy. How would this affect the way you behave and dress?

 

 

 

 

 

Smock (shift)

Worn to keep the body clean and protect the outer clothes from grease and sweat. Construction similar to men’s shirts with added side gores to add width at the bottom hem. Below knee length,usually mid calf. Linen, unbleached or semi-bleached (an old well washed smock would be white). Coarse to fine linen depending on status, with fine linen, embroidery and lace the province of the rich.

No drawstring or yoked neckline, either gathered onto a band (to a low collar or to fit neckline of bodies) closed with braid, cord or tape, or scooped plain.

Full or ¾ length sleeves, depending on waistcote sleeve length. With or without cuff closed with braid, cord, tape or fabric buttons.

 

 

 

Hose (stockings)

Knitted wool, or stitched wool or linen fabric. Gartered below the knee with tape or braid. Natural or period colours (see petticotes).

 

Bodies (stays, bodice)

The desired upper body silhouette of the time was conical. To obtain this silhouette ‘bodies’ or ‘stays’ were worn, stiffened with bents, cord or buckram; whalebone if you were rich. Often the petticote was simply attached to a stiffened sleeveless bodice, much like a present day pinafore dress. No bustline should be apparent and there should be smooth lines all round the body.

Bodies should be front fastening, back fastening only if your status is high enough to have servants to lace you in, and spiral laced with a single cord. They should not be worn without a smock underneath and a waistcote (or gown) on top, imagine it is the 17th century equivalent of a bra and then decide whether it would be acceptable for you to be seen out in it (even whores didn’t go out half-dressed much as popular myth would have us believe!).

If your bodies/stays are loose, not stiffened and fit anyone else, they are probably not right. Patterns for bodies/stays and bodice/petticote combination can be borrowed from the regiment along with instructions for making them. If you have any sewing skills we recommend having a go.

N.B. The leather stays that are available from traders are not correct and should not be worn.

Bum Roll

Optional; it is questioned whether working women wore them. Worn to simulate the ‘wide hipped’ fashion of the time. To be accurate to period they should be packed with wool fleece or well packed feathers,or for convenience something light and easy to wash as polyester wadding or kapok, though if you are going to be working on an open fire use something which is not flammable. Remember the aim is to create a fullness round the hips, not a shelf!

 

Petticote (Skirt)

One or two (or more depending on status). Wool, or linen (not too lightweight).

90-120” (2.25-3.3m) around hem, wide enough to allow for stride length. Simply a rectangle of cloth cartridge pleated into a waistband or onto bodies/bodice. Ankle length if you are working and you have good quality shoes, otherwise just above floor length but not dragging in the mud.

Cartridge pleated (not flat or box pleated). The pleats can be padded with an extra layer or two of wool, this makes construction easier and quicker. The regiment has samples of cartridge pleating to show you how it should be done.

Plain, subdued or natural colours with simple bands of decoration at the hem if appropriate. Most rural people wore natural coloured undyed wool (country grey).  If wool was dyed it was with natural dyes, the most common being madder red, which was thought to be a warm colour and used for both over and under petticotes. Amongst the cheapest dyes were madder (red), indigo and woad (blue) and weld (acid yellow). If wearing a linen petticote it should be a strong but period colour, so that it doesn’t look like your smock. (Colour samples might be available from the regiment).

If wearing two or more petticotes, the top one may be split to show an under petticote or hitched up at the front and/or sides.

(A petticote may be gathered onto a drawstring for ease of construction, this still gives the necessary shape at the waist where the cartridge pleats would sit and may be the easiest option for a first timer [or someone losing weight], but is best avoided in favour of proper construction).

 

 

 

Waistcote (Jacket)

Worn over bodies/stays or the stiffened bodice on which the petticote is attached, most ‘common’ women of the time are pictured wearing waistcotes. Made of wool orlinen (much cooler in summer), either lined or unlined, they were not stiffened and had a gored skirt. Variable neckline (low necklines covered in by a neckerchief when out of the home) and sleeve shape. With or without cuffs and/or shoulder wings. Closed with pins or hooks and eyes, very occasionally buttons, never laced up.

Natural or period colours.

During the 1630’s the fashion was for full, ¾ sleeved bodice/waistcotes with tabs (sometimes with a gored skirt). Worn without stays they were stiffened and boned to give the required silhouette. Of higher status than that usually displayed on our living histories.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coif (cap)

Linen, unbleached or bleached, coarse to fine depending on status. No lace or embroidery unless mid or high status (perhaps narrow lace for Sunday best). A fullyembroidered coif of the correct pattern is only acceptable if your character is of a high enough status (i.e. well off)

 

Various shapes and sizes (patterns are available from the regiment). Sometimes worn with a cross cloth. Hand stitched; it only takes a couple of hours to hand stitch a basic coif, even if you have never done it before, try it.

 

NB. If you have a look at paintings and woodcuts etc., you will find that almost without exception when a coif is worn there should be no hair showing. This is especially important for those who have short modern hairstyles and fringes, or the hair is dyed an unnatural colour. If your hair shows in the coif which you now wear, wear a cross-cloth, make yourself a larger coif or chose a different style. This will make all the difference from being a 21st century woman dressed in costume to being a 17th century character.

A more detailed presentation on coifs can be found here

 

 

 

Neckerchief

Linen, mid to fine depending on status. Finer than the linen of your smock.

Embroidery or lace only if middle or high status (perhaps narrow lace for Sunday best).

Pinned beneath chin with brass pin, and/or tucked into front of waistcote to cover low necklines and exposed smock.

Hand stitched, come on you have done the coif now this should be a doddle! 27” ( 70cm) square turned under and hemmed  along the edges and folded in half diagonally.

 

 

 

Apron

Unbleached or coloured linen or wool.

Any period colour, white was common for respectable ladies of the town when out shopping, but around the house or for working women and camp followers, coloured cloth was more usual.

An apron (or a Napron as it should be more correctly called) was used for all sorts of work; drying hands and dishes, carrying hot or dirty pans, wiping surfaces and utensils and cleaning out little boys ears!

Usually from below knee to petticote hem length, up to 36” (90cm) wide, either on a drawstring or gathered on to a narrow band or cord and tied once or twice around the waist.

 

 

Shoes

Leather to a period pattern, usually latchet shoes with a low heel, mule like shoes/slippers were known to be worn around the house.

Women are luckier than men in that very often their skirts cover their shoes and the worst problems can be hidden. If you are a new member and cannot afford period  shoes yet, dark brown (not coloured or light) flat or very low heel, lace up rather than plain or buckled shoes might be acceptable, please ask first.

No desert boots. In our aim for 100% period footwear, Winchester’s are now operating a subsidy system which will help members to buy period shoes at reduced prices. Please see an officer for details.

On suitable sites it might be possible go barefoot (and this is the only time you shouldn’t wear hose). If you do this remember that bobbling across slightly uncomfortable ground makes it obvious you’re not used to it, tough it out!!   Make sure your tetanus inoculations are up to date!

 

 

Hats

Mid-17th century women usually wore hats out of doors, increasingly likely the more respectable they were. Servants and lower classes might only wear a coif, depending on the weather.

Various natural colours.

Straw hats were often worn in summer. Otherwise wool or beaver felt depending on status, trimmed with tape or braid.

When wearing a hat please make sure of several things:

It does not look military; no regimental favours or coloured ribbons.

No feathers, especially ostrich, they were so expensive in the mid-17th century that only gentry would wear them (one feather cost the same as a musket).

Hats should be worn with a coif underneath and not have long flowing hair coming out of the back; this is only acceptable for men.

No fox tails. Anyway.

 

Gown

There are few pictures showing ‘common’ women out of doors in the mid-17th century wearing anything but waistcotes and petticotes; they may have worn several to keep out the worst of the cold, although earlier in the century long coat like gowns of heavy wool were worn, belted at the waist.

However there is some evidence that during our period one piece fitted gowns, petticotes attached to sleeved bodices, were beginning to be worn by women instead of a waistcote and petticote. Possibly more middle status.

Worn over bodies, fastened with hooks and eyes or pins (lacing appears later in the century).

The same fabrics and colours apply.

 

 

Cloak

Full length cloaks were only worn by women of high status. Made from two pieces of fabric, and cut from an arc of a circle, you should be able to open it out and lay it flat on the floor. If it has curved seams to fit the shoulders, you need to think about re-cutting it.

Useful on a chilly evening around the campfire but not appropriate for living histories.

Accessories:

 Bags

N.B. Women did not carry shoulder bags or snapsacks.

 

When out of the house women would usually carry a basket (of willow, rush or hazel). If you don’t have a suitable one, a bundle can be made from a piece of cloth which you can then tie and carry over your arm. A large bundle can be slung across the back.

A  purse, or small bag of cloth or leather, can be carried hung from a belt/girdle round the waist, either from a loop, or length of cord, string or thong.

Alternatively a separate ‘pocket’ can be tied around the waist under the petticote and accessed through an opening in the petticote fabric.

 

 

 

Children

A highly desirable accessory, they were very common in the mid-17th century and very few women would have been without one. They come in all shapes and sizes, none of which is inauthentic. If you haven’t got any, why not borrow some for the weekend!

See further down the guide for children’s clothing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little things make a big difference…

If your outfit is not up to the required standard, cover up with a large neckerchief and apron, a lot cheaper than the complete change of clothing which may take a few years to achieve. The desirable shape for a mid-17th century woman was larger than the early 21sth Century ideal; silhouette counts for so much. Don’t worry about what you think you look like; to the public you’ll look great.

Men

Standard Requirements

These are the garments which every non-military male member of the regiment on the living history site should be wearing within three years of joining or of receipt of this document. The regiment can help in lending patterns and booklets, and supplying advice and materials if required.

Shirt……………………………………………Linen
Braies (underpants) optional …………….Linen
Hose (stockings) ……………………………Wool or Linen
Breeches …………………………………….Wool, Linen canvas or Leather
Doublet and/or.. ……………………………Wool, Linen canvas or Leather
Coat ……………………………………………Wool or Linen canvas
Band (collar) …………………………………Linen
Shoes or Boots …………………………….Leather – period pattern

 

Each of these garments will be described as to the acceptable styles and forms in which they can be worn. Clothes may be either machine sewn with visible stitching done by hand, or entirely hand stitched as it would have been at the time; time consuming but very satisfying!

 

If buying clothing from traders please ask for advice before proceeding as many are not up to our standards.

Other articles of clothing can and should be worn where appropriate to the character which is being portrayed. Things to consider when choosing your clothes:  What is your status? How does your profession dictate how you dress, is there a conservative dress code to which you are expected to comply. If you are a common labourer where would obtain your clothing? Is it new or 2nd (3rd or 4th) hand? Who would make it, care for it and how?

 

 

Shirt

Like the female smock the shirt was worn to keep the body clean and protect the outer clothes from grease and sweat. Made of linen using a simple system of rectangles and squares. Roomy.

Linen, unbleached or semi-bleached (an old well washed shirt would be white), not coloured. Coarse to fine linen depending on status, with embroidery and lace the province of the rich.

With either a low or full collar, generally closed with narrow tape, braids or cords.

Front opening hemmed, not faced. Not laced up à la Errol Flynn!

With or without cuffs. Cuffs, if present, closed with narrow tape, cords or fabric buttons.

Length to mid-thigh or knees (shirt tails tucked between the legs when worn with breeches).

 

Seldom worn outside the home without a doublet or jerkin.

Waistcoat (singlet, vest)

Worn over shirt, under doublet for extra warmth, tucked into breeches. Knitted or wool fabric.

Braies (underpants)

Linen drawers, very like long boxer shorts. Generally with a draw string waist, but some examples of fixed waistbands exist.

Coarse to fine linen depending on status. Lace and embroidery only if rich.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hose (stockings)

May be knitted wool or stitched wool or linen fabric.

Gartered below the knee with tape or braid.

Natural or period colours.

 

 

 

 

 

Breeches

Wool, linen canvas or leather, generally lined with linen or wool. Fixed to the doublet with points, or hooks and eyes (via a girdlestead), at the start of the period, possibly self supporting later.

Various styles: Venetian, Cloakbag and Unconfined. Length to just below the knee. Style and quality of materials used dependent on status and occupation.

Gathered or pleated into a waistband, fastened with buttons or hooks and eyes.

May have pockets.

Fastened below the knee with tapes, braids, buttons or hooks and eyes.

Please do not run braids or tapes through bottom facing around knee to fix them, use eyelets at the opening, or sew braid or tape directly onto facing.

Natural or period colours

 

 

Doublet

A close fitting jacket with tabs, occasionally a skirt. More often than not with breeches attached with points or hooks and eyes via a girdlestead.

Made of wool, linen canvas or leather, depending on status and occupation. The quality of materials dependent on status and occupation.

May be unlined or lined with linen or wool, and with or without shoulder wings. Usually fastened with buttons. Natural or period colours

Jerkin

As above without sleeves. Worn alone or over doublet for extra warmth, or as protection for clothing in working environment. May have breeches attached as above. Fabrics as above.

Natural or period colours

Coat

Generally worn over doublet or jerkin. Made of wool or linen canvas, unlined or lined with wool or linen. The quality of materials dependent on status and occupation.

With or without shoulder wings and/or cuffs. Closed with buttons.

Natural or period colours

 

Band (Falling band, collar)

Separate collar, generally worn with a collarless shirt. Linen, as fine as your status can afford. Finer than the linen used for your shirt. Made from a rectangle of fabric shaped with ‘clocks’ (darts). Hand stitched.

Usually plain, without lace. Large laced falling bands were the province of the very rich.

Tied with cords or braids. May also be fixed to the shirt collar with pins.

Ruffs may be worn by those of the conservative professions, i.e. lawyer, cleric, alderman, and those of advanced years (well behind the fashions of the day).

 

 

 

 

Cloak

Cloaks appear to have been worn mainly by urban men instead of coats. Knee length, semi-circular, with collar. Possibly more middle status and upwards.

Wool, lined with linen or wool. Silk only for high status.

Natural or period colours.

 

 

 

 

Gown

Long coat like garment.

‘Academic’ type gown worn by the conservative professions. Heavier woollen belted ‘coat’ worn by the old.

Wool or linen. Unlined or lined with linen or wool.

Natural or period colours.

 

 

 

 

Shoes/boots

Leather to period pattern.

Usually latchet shoes but ‘startup’ boots worn in an agricultural or rural context.

No desert boots.

In our aim for 100% period footwear, Winchester’s are now operating a subsidy system which will help members to buy period shoes at reduced prices. Please see an officer for details.

 

 

 

Hats and other headwear.

Ubiquitous. When outside the house (and sometimes inside) all men wore a hat of some kind, from beaver or wool felt down to the lowly but very common Monmouth cap.

Linen day, or night, caps were worn in the house.

When wearing a hat please make sure of several things:

It does not look military; no regimental favours or coloured ribbons.

No feathers, especially ostrich, they were so expensive in the mid-17th century that only gentry would wear them (one feather cost the same as a musket).

No fox tails. Anyway.

 

 

 

 

Accessories:

Belts

Worn over the doublet or coat, not to hold up breeches (secure breeches to doublet/jerkin with points or hooks and eyes if loose). Leather. Not too wide. Avoid extraneous objects hanging from your belt, only those items associated with your occupation, and a leather pouch perhaps. No tankards!

Bags

Various shapes and sizes of bags, depending on occupation, from small wallets/budgets carried on the belt to large shoulder bags, bundles and baskets.

 

 

 

 

 

Aprons and other protective wear.

Aprons worn by men came in many shapes, sizes and period materials depending on occupation and activity.

 

Buttons

Various types of buttons were used to fasten coats, doublets and breeches. From flat shanked metal, to buttons made from scraps of fabric. What wasn’t used were the flat disc buttons with holes we are used to today, or wooden beads, which were used only as the foundation for thread work buttons. When choosing which buttons to use for different garments, it may be easier to ask for advice before proceeding.

Little things make a big difference…

Looking at early to mid 17th century illustrations it is obvious that men, with very few exceptions, were anything but clean shaven. Perhaps the quickest way to look really mid 17th century is to grow a beard!

Children

The fashion for dressing children in different clothes to adults is a relatively recent one. In the 17th century children would wear small versions of their parents’ clothing, whatever their status. Perhaps the children of poorer families wore hand-me-downs and cut off clothing. So the same guidelines apply as for adult clothing. The one exception to this was boys up to the age of 5 to 7, who wore petticotes instead of breeches. It might be difficult at first to get your son used to the idea, although we have found younger boys have no such problems. The regiment holds patterns and booklets for all children’s clothing from babies upwards, and plenty of families to give advice.

Here are some of the very few illustrations of ‘common’ children from the period:

 

Things to avoid at all costs…

We know you don’t really need telling about these, but if it’s not put in the guidelines then a new recruit may come along and say that nobody said they couldn’t actually do it.

Make Up

A definite no no, don’t even bother bringing your make up bag with you. Make up was not worn by respectable women. If you wear any on a Winchester’s living history site you will be asked to remove it. That goes for the men too!

Modern Glasses

These are more difficult and alternatives can be very expensive. If you can manage at all please go without, it doesn’t matter if you can’t read (not many men and women could at the time) or recognise someone’s face.

Try to get contact lenses; they’re getting cheaper and more accessible all the time.

If you have to wear glasses you can get reproduction period spectacle frames into which you can have your own prescription lenses fitted. (In extremis rimless or unobtrusive wire frames might be worn, but please ask first).

Sunglasses

No, simply do not wear them. If the sun is a problem wear a wide brimmed straw hat.

 

 

Jewellery

You may wear a simple wedding band, if you have an engagement ring which you cannot or do not wish to remove, it is best to turn it inside your finger. If you are working in a living history it may be best to further protect this by a small piece of sticky tape (on the inside!) to cover it and hold it in place. Plain gold studs or small hoop earrings may be worn if they cannot be removed, your coif should be the correct size and pattern to cover them, men please remove earrings unless they are appropriate for your character. All other jewellery must be removed, especially facial piercings. No watches, regimental medals or other regalia.

Pushchairs

If your child is normally in a pushchair and you cannot carry them or they will not walk, then you should stay in 21st century clothing. Some sponsors now have this as a regulation on their sites so it will be easier if we are used to it.

Cigarettes

You don’t really need telling that Sir Walter Rayleigh was mad!! Find somewhere completely away from the public, or get a clay pipe.

Electronic equipment

Please do not use cameras, mobile phones or music players in sight of the public while in kit. If for any reason you must carry your mobile phone please set it to silent, placed in a pocket or bag where the public cannot see it.

Speech

Please do not use modern slang or swear words, nothing shatters the 17th century impression quicker. Look up and use sayings of the time; they are far more entertaining!

Pewter Tankards

In the interest of the CO’s continuing good health and normal blood pressure, please don’t bring pewter tankards onto the living history site; they weren’t known before the 1650s.

Clothing care and treatment

 

Many of us are so proud of our outfits that we want to keep them as good and clean as the day they were made. However, period pure wool was difficult to wash and dry without shrinkage, try not to wash your clothes every time you wear them, just brush off the excess mud and wash, or dry clean, only when you really have to.

Linen items may be washed regularly but note that with all unbleached linen cloth you will need to wash it in either ‘wool-wash’ or ‘colour’ type washing powder or liquid, otherwise it will bleach much quicker than it would in the 17th century.

Don’t iron fresh creases into clothing, you may have been “sleeping” in it the night before. If you must iron linen make sure you do so while the fabric is damp, ironing dry linen will damage it.

If you rip something make an obvious repair (not a different coloured patch sewn on with blanket stitch; too pantomime).

Use old faded material to make your outfits.

Leave buttons missing if poor.

Rub the elbows, shoulders and other wear points with sandpaper to make it look older and more worn. Rub exposed edges with Vaseline. Don’t worry that this will reduce the lifespan of your kit, just think about how many times you wear it. If it wears out after five years that’s a good excuse to go shopping!

 

References and Further Information

 

The regiment holds various clothing patterns and booklets to borrow, and has several people available for advice. Please do not hesitate to ask. Meanwhile the following books, booklets and online links are recommended for those wishing to make their own clothing.

Perfect Linens. Sarah Thursfield. Shirts and smocks from medieval to 19th century. Very easy to follow instructions. Includes patterns and stitching instructions. Available from: www.sarahthursfield.com. (Also available Coif, Baby and Children’s clothing pattern packs).

Clothes of the Common Woman 1580-1660. Robert Morris. Stuart Press. Uses illustrations, wills, inventories and other sources to establish who was wearing what clothes, cuts, fabrics and colours.

Clothes of the Common Woman 1580-1660 part 2: Making the Garments. Jane Huggett. Stuart Press. Takes the information in part 1 and produces a reasoned interpretation of how to reproduce the garments worn. Includes patterns.

How to make a Petticote and Bodice of 1580-1660. Gilly Morley. Stuart Press. A step-by-step guide. Includes patterns.

Clothes of the Common Man 1580-1660. Robert Morris. Stuart Press. Uses illustrations, wills, inventories and other sources to establish who was wearing what clothes, cuts, fabrics and colours.

Clothes of the Common Man 1580-1660 part 2: Making the Garments. Jane Huggett. Stuart Press. Takes the information in part 1 and produces a reasoned interpretation of how to reproduce the garments worn. Includes patterns.

Headwear, Footwear and Trimmings of the Common People 1580-1660. Robert Morris. Stuart Press. Examines the accessories such as points, buttons, lace, hooks and eyes, purses etc. plus non linen headwear, footwear and stockings of common people.

Children’s Clothing 1580-1660. Jane Huggett. Stuart Press. Includes patterns

Textiles and Materials of the Common Man and Woman 1580-1660. Edited by Stuart Peachey. Stuart Press. Provides detailed information on the fabrics used by common people identified in the works above.

Dyeing the Clothing of the Common folk 1580-1660. Peachey and Hopkins. Stuart Press. Analyses what dyed colours were used for what garments by which common people and gives instructions on the methods used to produce those colours.

The Art of the Dyer 1500-1700. David Hopkins. Stuart Press. Draws on a wide variety of European sources to explain the techniques for producing coloured cloth.

Natural Dyes for Vegetable Fibres. Gill Dalby. Ashill Publications. How to dye linen. (Not all dyes are period).

Patterns of Fashion 3: 1560-1620. Janet Arnold. Macmillan. The cut and construction of clothes for men and women c. 1560 – 1620. Includes patterns.

Patterns of Fashion 4. Janet Arnold. Macmillan. The cut and construction of linen shirts, smocks, neck wear, head wear and accessories for men and women c. 1540 – 1660. Includes patterns.

Seventeenth-Century Women’s Dress Patterns Book 1. (Women’s Dress Patterns 1) Edited by Susan North and Jenny Tiramani. V & A Publishing. Includes patterns, stitching, knitting and lacemaking instructions.

Seventeenth-Century Women’s Dress Patterns Book 2. (Women’s Dress Patterns 2) Edited by Susan North and Jenny Tiramani. V & A Publishing. Published July 2012.  Includes patterns.

The King’s English: 17th C Words and Phrases. Liz Smith. Partizan Press. A Dictionary of 17th century words with their modern meanings, including Phrases, Greetings & Titles, Slang, Sample Conversations & Letters.

English Civil War (ECWs) Living History Resource. Website http://lhresources.wordpress.com/ . “How to make and source things Mid 17th Century”. Galleries of clothing and artefacts. Book lists. Links to suppliers.

The 1640s Picturebook. Website: http://the1642goodwyfe.wordpress.com/ .  A selection of English and Scottish images mainly from the 1640s intended primarily as a costume guide.

Ready to wear (1640’s style). Website: http://thegoodwyfe.blogspot.co.uk/ . The website of a group whose aim is to improve the kit and clothes of English Civil War re-enactment, using the most up to date references and research.

N.B. The Marquess of Winchester’s Regiment is not responsible for the content of external websites.

© The Marquess of Winchester’s Regiment, 2012.

Top